Tent and Air mattress

rjr1

Just bought a Quest four man tent that measures 8 feet by 10 feet... question: Can I put (2) queen size air mattresses in it?

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rustyj14

Geez! Go buy a tape measure, and figure it out! Holy cow--didn't you learn anything in school--except how to toss spit-balls at the cute girl in eigth grade?!?

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rjr1

I did learn how to spell Rusty old boy.... which apparently you did not learn to do!

If anyone else has an intelligent response, I would appreciate it.

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Tiffany, purpleinopp Z8b Opp, AL

Although the delivery of the tape measure advice was unpleasant, it's appropriate I think. Items sold as queen size air mattress do not all have the same dimensions. Head-to-toe, you could get anything from 70-78 inches. Side-to-side could go from 54-60 inches. So the footprint of the beds would technically fit in the tent BUT you would have absolutely NO room to step into the tent, change clothes, or to store your "stuff." Also, most tents lose their ability to be a moisture barrier when you touch the inside walls. Tent walls usually do not go straight up and down, they usually slope in toward the top, so your beds would be touching the walls, which would cause you to wake up moist, dewy wet on the edges of the beds.

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tplife

Friends don't let friends buy air mattresses (or cots). Unless you plan on doing all you camping only during summer, think again. There's a good reason both the US military and the Boy Scouts only use sleeping pads, rather than cots or air mattresses. Those two are only for use inside heated enclosures. Besides losing good sleep because your body is giving up calories to the heat-sink effects of the air mattress or cot, you risk catching hypothermia (most cases of hypothermia occur at between 30 and 50-degrees F). The hollow tubes of an air mattress and the empty space underneath cots work constantly to achieve equilibrium with the colder air around them, meaning you are constantly having your warmth drained away. Buy a ThermaRest self-inflating sleeping pad or one of the knockoffs made by REI or Slumberjack or one of the others. They are sold in many designs, widths, lengths and thicknesses and the ThermaRest brand carries a lifetime guarantee.

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tylert27

Yes, an 8 x 10 foot tent will be plenty of room. Queen size mattresses are only 5 x 6.6 feet.

Here is a link that might be useful: Queen Matress Dimensions

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dalew

Well ... to each his own, as the old saying goes.

I don't like those large air mattress, i.e., in a tent, for camping! My tent is a 9' X 9' and since there's seldom more then two of us (most times alone!), I like a low profile (large) cot using a pad with it. There's plenty of room for two cots plus using a 2' X 3' plastic tote container, in between, as a night stand.

I know ... that had nothing to do with the original question!

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josouthcarolina

I've used a queen air mattress in the tent and it's okay, but I really prefer cots with a thermarest on it. It takes the sag out of the cot and the ribs of it don't poke you in your side. Also, you can store and lot of gear under a cot. I use a little folding table that's about 14" square for a nightstand.

A large mattress just takes up too much room and leaves very little floor space, and you have your gear laying all around in pretty much a big mess. Guess I'm too much of a neatnick!

Jo

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tplife

I like hollow-tube air mattresses, and hammocks, and I LOVE COTS! That said, I camp in months other than July and August and don't like giving up sleeping comfort to a heat-sink. Best bet is a ThermaRest pad right on the tent floor- if you seek more comfort, don't throw your money away on cots, but rather a thicker pad from ThermaRest or MegaMat or one of the other high-end lifetime-guarantee pads. It's hard to argue with science! :)

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a.girl.named.max

I have done a lot of camping mainly in northern Minnesota. I LOVE my single layer air mattress and sleeping bag combination. Our sleeping bags have straps on the bottoms to hold the air mattresses in place. Extremely comfy and warm to about 35 degrees. We find it much better than a TermaRest or cot and much less expensive. We also have the option of zipping and fastening two sleeping bags and two air mattresses together to get queen sized sleeping arrangment.

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