roasted peanuts vs raw peanuts

ontario_backyardAugust 27, 2009

...unsalted of course. My backyard birds eat both roasted and raw peanuts, I wonder what is better for them. Any thoughts?

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chinamigarden

I use both.

I use raw, whole peanuts in the shell. The shell provides some protection from pathogens that might harm the birds. The jays love them
I use roasted, or blanched, splits. The cooking kills off any salmonella present prior to bagging and shipping.

    Bookmark   August 28, 2009 at 10:50AM
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rachel_frome_ky

Salt can kill birds, and cooking kills enzymes and much nutrition value in food

    Bookmark   August 28, 2009 at 11:50AM
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ltcollins1949

How about just plain old raw, unsalted boiled peanuts still in the shell?

    Bookmark   September 2, 2009 at 9:54AM
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larrysheldon

"Boiled" peanuts are not "raw" peanuts to my way of thinking.

I'm not sure what I use--the peanuts-in-shell are "raw" I'm pretty sure, but the pieces (look like warehouse sweepings) might be roasted. I'll taste one next time I am out there (the deck and "three seasons" room where thge bird stuff is).

    Bookmark   September 2, 2009 at 11:04AM
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ltcollins1949

Obviously after being boiled they are no longer raw, but the reason I mention it is for those of you that are worried about the birds. I buy raw peanuts in the shells, neither roasted nor salted. They can just be boiled for a short while if you are worried about pathogens harming the birds or roasted.

I found the following information on website: http://www.avianweb.com/feedingwildbirds.html

Peanuts: Feeding shelled unsalted peanuts isn't messy and they are highly nutritious for the birds that can eat them. Most birds can shell whole (unshelled) peanuts, with varying degrees of effort. Squirrels love peanuts. However, don't feed RAW peanuts to squirrels and other animals because it can seriously hurt them. Raw peanuts and other legumes contain a trypsin inhibitor or substance that inhibits or prevents the pancreas from producing trypsin, an enzyme essential for the absorption of protein by the intestine. Squirrels fed a steady diet of raw peanuts, soybeans. other legumes, and sweet potatoes could easily develop severe malnutrition. According to the Washington State Cooperative Extension Service, roasting hulled raw peanuts for 20 to 30 minutes at 300 degrees Fahrenheit, stirring them frequently, will destroy the trypsin inhibitor and render them suitable for feed. If that sounds like a lot of work, buy roasted peanuts but be sure they aren't salted. (Salted nuts of any kind should never be fed to wild animals.)

ÂPeanuts are liked by the following birds: Bluejays, Scrub Jays, House Finches, Cardinals, Woodpeckers, Magpies, Chickadees, Nuthatches, Titmice, White-crowned and White-throated Sparrows eat peanuts.

    Bookmark   September 2, 2009 at 2:06PM
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ontario_backyard

I am wondering about the cautionary note against feeding raw peanuts to wild animals, including wild birds. The cautionary note is pretty strongly worded. Wild birds and other wild animals eat raw peanuts all the time. Of course, any lopsided diet, of peanuts or otherwise, will always be bad.

    Bookmark   September 4, 2009 at 7:18PM
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